Types of single-parent family


single parent family

A single-parent family is formed when the other biological parent has permanently left the picture, abandoned the child(ren), is dead, incarcerated, in residential treatment for serious mental illness, etc. Family structures are not always easy to define since personal autonomy and choice can blur the definition. For example, a child may choose to consider his/her stepfather as their primary male stand-in parent. If such choices are not fully thought through, they can lead to problems once the child becomes an adult and tries to form independent relationships with others (new partners or friends, for instance). Here are a few types of single-parent families.

1. Single Father Family

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A single father family consists of a father and his children. Divorce, death of spouse, or separation from their spouse leaves the other parent to raise the child/children alone. This type of family is becoming more common in many societies. The number of single-father families has increased in most Western countries during recent years because more parents are getting divorced and more fathers are choosing to be stay-at-home parents.

2. Single Mother Family

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A single mother family is a household with a child or children being raised by their mother, without the involvement of the biological father in the upbringing. There are many variations in this type of family: some mothers may have full custody of their children, while others may share custody with the father.

3. Single Parent Households

A single-parent household refers to a variety of family situations in which one parent is primarily responsible for raising a child or children. As compared to two-parent households where both parents are present, single-parent homes do not have two adults devoting their full attention to the family. In a study of households in 2002, 34% of single parents were men, 12% had never been married, 31% were divorced or separated, 18% were widowed and 10% were always-single mothers (never married and living without a partner).

4. Sole Parenting

Sole parenting is a form of parenting where one parent has sole custody over the children. The other parent may live nearby or spend time with them on weekends but isn’t part of day-to-day upbringing. This type of family is becoming more common in many societies. The number of single-father families has increased in most Western countries during recent years because more parents are getting divorced and more fathers are choosing to be stay-at-home parents.

Sole parenting is a form of parenting where one parent has sole custody over the children. The other parent may live nearby or spend time with them on weekends but isn’t part of day-to-day upbringing. This type of family is becoming more common in many societies. The number of single-father families has increased in most Western countries during recent years because more parents are getting divorced and more fathers are choosing to be stay-at-home parents.

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