Types of co parenting


Three other types of co-parenting are discussed below. They include:

Shared Physical Custody (SPC):

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The child lives primarily with one parent but spends at least 40% of their time with the other parent.

Shared Legal Custody (SLC):

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The child lives primarily with one parent, but both parents make decisions about education, religion, and non-emergency medical care.

Sole Physical Custody (SPC):

One parent has sole physical custody over a child – meaning that they have legal custody and are the only one who can make decisions about the child’s life – and the other parent has visitation rights.

Sole Legal Custody (SLC):

One parent has sole legal custody over a child – meaning that they have physical custody and are the only one who can make decisions about the child’s life – and the other parent has no visitation rights.

co-parenting relationships

co-parenting relationships can be a challenge, but the rewards can be great. When both parents can work together, they can provide a more balanced home life for their children.

time to develop

co-parenting relationships take time to develop. Both parents need to be communicative and open with each other. They should also be willing to listen to each other’s concerns and respect the needs of the children.

Communication

Communication between co-parenting partners is a vital component in a successful relationship. When both parents share information about their schedules, it gives them a chance to make arrangements for their children. They can also discuss any issues or problems that may arise. In many cases, one parent may be better equipped to deal with a particular issue. By communicating openly, the parents can work together to find the best solution.

co-parenting relationships also require cooperation. When both parents can put their differences aside and work together for the good of the children, it can be very beneficial. Children need stability in their lives and they benefit

benefits of co-parenting

Co-parenting is becoming an increasingly popular choice for parents, and good reason. When done effectively, co-parenting can provide many benefits for both parents and children.

In co-parenting relationships, both parents commit to parenting their children together. They do this by talking about decisions before they are made and by making joint decisions whenever possible. For example, if one parent has decided on a new school for the child, the other parent should be included in that decision so that he or she can help support the child in the new school.

Co-parenting can also be done without an equal commitment to co-parenting from both parents. The parent who is less willing may not be willing or able to respect the other parent’s involvement with the children, or he or she may only agree to co-parenting because of a legal order. This type of co-parenting arrangement is usually not as effective as those where both parents are willing and able to respect each other’s role in the children’s lives.

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